Liquor Licence Lawyer South Africa

Need a liquor licence?

We can help! Complete the form below and lets get talking…

Trusted by:

Get Started

Fill in the simple form below to begin the licensing process.
Not sure which liquor licence is right for you? Read about the types of liquor licence here.

AFFORDABLE & EFFICIENT

Top class liquor licensing application services at an affordable rate.

CUSTOM MANAGED SERVICES

We will manage the entire process from start to finish, custom to your needs.

QUICK TURNAROUND

Licence approvals with little or no delay. Register a liquor licence in the shortest possible time.

About Us

We manage liquor licence applications for:

On-consumption | Off-consumption | On and Off consumption | Micro breweries

We strive to expedite and streamline the liquor licence application process. To this end, we can assist with having your liquor licence approved with little or no delay. Furthermore, our top-class liquor licensing application services are provided at an affordable rate. Our experience with registrations and long standing relationships with the industry role players give us the competitive advantage in registering licences. Your application will be handled by an experienced legal team and your liquor licence registered efficiently.

Our Packages

Our pricing model is simple and transparent. Your first consultation is always free.

MICRO MANUFACTURE LICENCE

FROM:
R15000

100% upfront payment required

ON-CONSUMPTION LICENCE

FROM:
R15000

100% upfront payment required

OFF-CONSUMPTION LICENCE

FROM:
R15000

100% upfront payment required

EVENT LIQUOR LICENCE

FROM:
R6000

100% upfront payment required

Our Clients

We are proud to have assisted the following clients with their liquor licensing needs.

Liquor Licence Lawyer clients

Testimonials

Our Team

Simon Dippenaar

Simon Dippenaar

Founder & Managing Partner, SD Law

Liquor Licence Lawyer was created by Simon Dippenaar, who holds Bachelor of Business Science, Bachelor of Laws, and Professional Diploma in Legal Practice qualifications from the University of Cape Town. Simon is an admitted attorney of the High Court of South Africa. Mr Dippenaar is also the contributing editor of wine.co.za. He is also the founder and director of Simon Dippenaar & Associates, a private legal practice.

Marisa Janse van Vuuren

Marisa Janse van Vuuren

Liquor Licensing Specialist

Marisa obtained her LLB degree from the University of Stellenbosch in 2003 and was admitted as an Attorney of the High Court of South Africa in 2005. She has 10 years exclusive experience in liquor licencing legislation. She assists with advice, opinions and applications in terms of the Western Cape Liquor Act as well as the National Liquor Act. She is also the Director of her own consultancy business, namely Liquor Law Advisors (Pty) Ltd. Marisa has a passion for assisting clients to achieve their goals. She is organized, has an eye for detail and put the client’s best interest first.

From the Blog

WCLA issues nearly R7m in fines to Western Cape liquor outlets

Reprinted from Cape Town etc., by Ilze-Mari van Zyl – 2024-02-15

The Western Cape Liquor Authority (WCLA) issued 169 fines amounting to nearly R7 million to licensed liquor outlets across the province between November 2022 and November 2023.

The total number of fines amounted to R6 990 000, of which 49 totalling R2 100 000 were issued to licence holders in the priority areas.

Furthermore, a total of 6 112 inspections were conducted, of which 3 771 (61%) occurred in priority areas. According to the Western Cape Government, 83 non-compliance reports were submitted, of which 50 or nearly 70%, were derived from priority areas.

These notices range from:

  • Failing to comply with the conditions of the licence
  • Failing to comply with the Western Cape Liquor Act
  • Compliance notices

The priority areas include:

  • Atlantis
  • Bishop Lavis
  • Delft
  • Khayelitsha
  • Kraaifontein
  • Mfuleni
  • Mitchells Plain
  • Nyanga
  • Harare
  • Gugulethu and Philippi (Hanover Park).
  • Across the five district municipalities, the areas include Beaufort West (Central Karoo), George (Garden Route), Witzenberg, (Cape Winelands), Swartland (West Coast) and Theewaterskloof (Overberg) Municipalities.

‘The continued work of the WCLA is critical to combat the harms associated with the abuse of alcohol. I am encouraged by the operations of the inspectors, as we have seen where [outlets are operating] outside the parameters of the law, further and avoidable acts of lawlessness tend to occur,’ says Reagen Allen, the Western Cape’s MEC of police oversight and community safety.

He adds that during the July to September 2023 period, 16 people were killed, 12 attempted murders were recorded, six alleged rapes were reported and 119 cases of grievous bodily harm occurred at liquor outlets.

‘It is deeply concerning to note that the majority of the non-compliance reports come from priority areas. I encourage the inspectors to maintain their level of scrutiny, as this will assist in combatting crime that might be linked to the misuse of liquor.’

‘Furthermore, I urge liquor traders to adhere to and comply with their licensing conditions, as this will ensure that they remain profitable, continue to create jobs, and not contribute to any criminal activity.’

‘We all have a role to play in creating safer communities and we urge businesses to work with us to reach our goals.’


Help with your liquor licence

If your liquor licence application renewal is outstanding we can help you with submission and the correct documentation. We can handle objections and manage any compliance issues. Get legal help with your liquor licence application here.

Further reading:

COPS DISCOVER FAKE BOOZE DISTILLERY IN KHAYELITSHA

Cops discover fake booze distillery in Khayelitsha

Reprinted from iol.com, by Byron Lukas – 2024-01-08

Cape Town – Cape Town law enforcement officers cracked down on an illegal distillery in Khayelitsha where people were allegedly dealing in, and manufacturing, alcohol.

Law Enforcement spokesperson Wayne Dyason said the officers were out on patrol in the area on Friday when they came across the goods.

“The vehicle seemed heavily loaded but had only two occupants, which seemed odd and raised the suspicion of the officers.”

According to Dyason, after officers stopped and searched the vehicle they found eight 25-litre sealed canisters containing what they thought were chemicals.

“The driver claimed it was water. The officers then took the vehicle to Harare SAPS and went with the two suspects to their residence,” he said.

At the property, the officers discovered several bottles of various alcohol brands like Old Buck Gin, Gordon’s Gin, Jameson Whiskey and Smirnoff Vodka. The officers also found empty boxes of Gordon’s Gin bottles, bottle caps and stickers as well as 17 sealed 25-litre canisters containing chemicals.

Nine large canvas bags of empty Old Buck and Gordon’s Gin 750ml bottles, Gordon’s Gin cardboard boxes and R2750 in cash were also discovered.

Dyason confirmed that both suspects were arrested and charged under the Liquor Act.

“Both suspects were detained at Harare SAPS and charged with dealing in liquor without a liquor licence, and manufacturing and bottling of alcohol without a liquor licence. All charges are under the Liquor Act,” he said.

Help with your liquor licence

If your liquor licence application renewal is outstanding we can help you with submission and the correct documentation. We can handle objections and manage any compliance issues. Get legal help with your liquor licence application here.  

Further reading:

Strategies for combating illicit trade in the liquor industry

Strategies for combating illicit trade in the liquor industry

The nature of the illegal sale of alcohol means it is difficult to quantify the precise scale of illicit trade in the liquor industry. But Tax Justice South Africa, an NGO set up to tackle the large-scale tax evasion that is depriving South Africans of vital services, estimates that 500 million litres of illegal alcohol is consumed in South Africa every year, costing the country R6 billion in taxes. Furthermore, because the manufacture of illegal alcohol is unregulated, it may contain fatal levels of alcohol or other toxic ingredients. What is being done to combat the illicit trade in liquor? 

Regulation

Illegal sale of alcohol in the Western Cape is currently regulated by SAPS. It is not regulated by the Western Cape Liquor Authority and therefore premises suspected of illegal trading are not inspected by Inspectors from the Western Cape Liquor Authority. This activity falls outside of the scope of the Western Cape Liquor Act 4 of 2008 (as amended).  

White paper

The Western Cape Liquor Authority drafted the Western Cape alcohol-related harm reduction policy which currently is currently available for comment. The White Paper states:  

“Unlicensed liquor outlets and the illicit liquor trade identifies the concern of a lack of regulation leading to increased harm and the loss of tax and licence revenue that can be used to mitigate harms. 

The policy proposes taking steps to bring responsible unlicensed liquor outlets into the regulated space in a sustainable and responsible manner, identifying mechanisms and criteria that will enable the re-zoning of outlets for liquor sales in appropriate residential areas and prioritising upstream interventions targeting suppliers to the unlicensed liquor industry and the illicit liquor trade. 

Awareness of alternative economic opportunities should be provided to currently unlicensed outlet owners. Liquor enforcement units are to be capacitated and strengthened through increased resources and an integrated liquor enforcement approach, among other proposals.”

According to the Western Cape Liquor Authority, the number of licensed liquor outlets in the Western Cape in December 2015 was 9,296, comprising 8,888 liquor licences issued by the Western Cape Liquor Authority and 408 issued by the National Liquor Authority. In a 2015 survey, the number of unlicensed liquor outlets in the Western Cape was estimated at 3,483, equal to 37% of licensed outlets.

The White Paper proposes the following policy interventions:  

  • Take steps to bring some responsible unlicensed liquor outlets into the regulated space in a sustainable and responsible manner to facilitate compliance with minimum requirements.

The regulated space must be attractive for both traders and their customers. Incentives for becoming a licensed outlet should be clearly identified and communicated to current illegal outlets as well as the consequences of not becoming licensed. The application process for liquor licences must be simplified and streamlined.

  • Identify mechanisms and criteria, working with municipalities, that will enable the re-zoning of outlets for liquor sales in appropriate residential areas.

The importance of this is to ensure there is a clear basis for re-zoning. Zoning is a municipal competence. The issuing of liquor licences is a provincial competence and the proposal is to ensure collaboration between the two spheres of government in order to reduce harm, while bringing a predictable and regulated environment, particularly for outlets in residential areas. 

  • Prioritise upstream interventions targeting suppliers to the unlicensed liquor industry and the illicit liquor trade. 

A key strategy to combat the unlicensed liquor industry and the illicit liquor trade is to cut off the supply at the source. Obtaining information from community structures and enforcement officials of the licensed traders supplying the liquor, targeting enforcement operations on these licensed traders and lobbying for the prioritisation of the prosecution of them is recommended as a focus area. 

  • Place evidence before the justice system to argue for the prioritisation of liquor law transgressions and to be considered in the sentencing process for tougher sanctions. 

Unlicensed liquor outlets that cannot be brought into the regulated space and those that do not comply must face the consequences of the justice system, be prosecuted and closed down. Alcohol’s mind-altering effects are drivers of various and extensive harms, including violence (especially gender-based violence) and criminal activities such as robbery, murder and assault. The courts need to be cognisant of this and prosecutors need to be assisted with evidence, such as academic studies and statistics, placed before the courts. Consistent prosecution and heavier sentences will also act as an incentive to become licensed. 

  • Create awareness of alternative economic opportunities to currently unlicensed outlet owners who cannot be accommodated within the applicable zoning scheme.

A clear strategy benefiting and empowering individuals regarding economic alternatives must be developed and shared with the affected parties, including information on relevant business support programmes. 

This White Paper was drafted and has been in circulation since 2015, so whether these amendments and proposals are ever implemented remains to be seen.  

Help with your liquor licence

If your liquor licence application renewal is outstanding we can help you with submission and the correct documentation. We can handle objections and manage any compliance issues. Get legal help with your liquor licence application here.  

Let Us Take Care of Your Liquor Licence Needs

Contact Info

Want a call back?

Enter your details and one of our attorneys will contact you back to discuss your application

Find Us

Radio House, 92 Loop Street, Cape Town City Centre

Ready to get started?

Click the button to below to commence by filling out our webform, it only takes a few minutes.